Holiday Celebration 2016

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Holidays at Velvet da Vinci
The 26th Annual Holiday Celebration December 1-31

Holiday Reception Sunday December 4, 11-5

Special Holiday gifts by gallery artists.

Holiday Hours: Monday-Saturday 11-6, Sunday 11-5

415-441-0109

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Brooch detail, Nikki Couppee

Joanna Gollberg

Joanna Gollberg

Kat Cole

Kat Cole

April Higashi

April Higashi

David Huang

David Huang

Kath Inglis

Kath Inglis

Susanne Matsche

Susanne Matsche

Mike & Maaike

Mike & Maaike

Jo Pond

Jo Pond

Florian Ladstaetter

Florian Ladstaetter

Mark Hartung

Mark Hartung

Niki Ulehala

Niki Ulehla

Brooke Marks-Swanson

Brooke Marks-Swanson

Junko Mori

Junko Mori

Timothy Carson

Timothy Carson

Garry Knox Bennett

Garry Knox Bennett

Gateway Drugs Pop-Up Jewelry Event

Two Days Only!

Saturday November 19, 11-6 and Sunday November 20, 11-4

Opening Reception Saturday November 19, 6-8pm

Gateway Drugs Pop-Up Jewelry Event highlights jewelry from 25 international artists and creates a multi-faceted opportunity to introduce a new selection of artist-made, contemporary jewelry. Organized by Mariah Tuttle.

Participating artists: Farrah Al-Dujaili (United Kingdom), Lynn Batchelder (USA), LizClark (USA), Nikki Couppee (USA), Anna Davern (Australia), Linnea Erikson (Sweden), Kiko Gianocca (Switzerland), Adam Grinovich (Sweden/USA), Nils Hint (Estonia), Christine Jalio (Finland), Sooyeon Kim (Korea), Yong Joo Kim (Korea), Panjapol Kulpapangkorn (Thailand), Zachery Lechtenberg (USA), Heng Lee (Taiwan), Helmi Lindblom (Finland), Helena Johansson Lindell (Sweden), Tara Locklear (USA), Seth Papac (USA), Carina Shoshtary (Germany), Demitra Thomloudis (USA), Lauren Tickle (USA), Nelly Van Oost (France/Belgium), Sarah West (USA), and Mallory Weston (USA).

Kerianne Quick: Ballast

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November 4 – November 20, 2016

Artist’s Reception Friday, November 4, 2016, 6-8pm

Material foraged out of the Hudson River and Rondout Creek are shifted in form and used to explore the post-industrial landscape, regional histories, visibility and camouflage, the human impulse to adorn, and cultural substitutions/additions/deletions.

The brickworks that once occupied the shores of the Hudson River and its tributaries used the banks to discard failed fired bricks. These failures are the containers of the hope, pride, greed, labor, sweat, and process of a rich industrial culture. The now exhausted clay deposit, dug from these same banks, returns; a prodigal son, formed, hardened, humbled, repentant. Transformed from their natural state by fire but unusable as building materials, they exist as erratics, each possessing a characteristic naming it as aberration, odd, unsuitable. Slowly they transform again, this time by the tidewaters, breaking down not into what they were, but into something new. Added to the river ecosystem as discards they become a decorative surface–both coarse and fine. As remains of an exhausted resource and defunct process they become a finite material. As a material found in but not belonging to the landscape they become a way to examine place, history, and the ways we carry both with us. The fruits of the river–oysters, shad, sturgeon–replaced by brickworks, cement, mineral mines, and stone quarries. As European immigrants settled the land and displaced the native Algonquin speaking tribes, culture and its produce also shifted from hunter to farmer to industry. From shell, bone, and skin to pearl, metal, and silk.

The hand-cut and carved bricks are combined with pearls, shell, silk, silver and gold. Using stringing and pearl knotting techniques, the work plays between the adornment ideals of the Dutch Golden Age and the ceremonial adornment of the native Lenape Tribes of the Hudson River Valley. The resulting objects are hybrid artifacts that articulate a proposed series of cultural substitutions/additions/deletions.

Process info:

The work consists of both practical and theoretical jewelry objects, made from discarded bricks from the brickworks of the Hudson River Valley. All the bricks were hand cut and carved. Some were tumbled to appear as they would if they were washed for years in the waves of the river. Some were strung using traditional pearl knotting techniques on silk, while others required that the stringing material be steel cable in order to support the weight of the brick material. Aluminum crimps were used to connect the steel cable or in place of ‘knots’ to suspend the brick segments along the cable. Polyolefin shrink tube was used as a coating to protect the bricks from wear and the wearer from the rough surface of the steel cable.

About the Artist:

Kerianne Quick is Assistant Professor of Jewelry and Metalwork at San Diego State University. Her scholarly research mixes traditional and digitally driven making processes with material focused historical and ethnographic inquiries to consider how objects can be embedded with meaning.

Kerianne has produced several bodies of material specific work considering subject matters that range from communal sheep farming practices in the Orkney Isles to the derelict brickyards of New York’s Hudson Valley. She is currently researching contemporary forms of portable wealth among migrants seeking asylum/refugee status. With her creative practice, Kerianne aims to tell hidden stories through object making – by considering source, geography, and material specificity. Her research is rooted in exploring craft and materiality as cultural phenomena with an emphasis on jewelry and personal adornment.

Transmutations 15, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 15, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Ballast Installation

Ballast Installation

Transmutations 4, 2016, foraged brick, inherited glass beads, silk, sterling silver, stainless steel

Transmutations 4, 2016, foraged brick, inherited glass beads, silk, sterling silver, stainless steel

Transmutations 8, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, gold clasp from an inherited necklace

Transmutations 8, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, gold clasp from an inherited necklace

Transmutations 20, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, sterling silver, nickel silver, stainless steel

Transmutations 20, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, sterling silver, nickel silver, stainless steel

Transmutations 14, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 14, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 10, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver, nickel silver

Transmutations 10, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver, nickel silver

Ballast Installation

Ballast Installation

Ballast Installation

Ballast Installation

Transmutations 6, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 6, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 5, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver, stainless steel

Transmutations 5, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver, stainless steel

Transmutations 18, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 18, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

 

Transmutations 17, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Transmutations 17, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver

Ballast Installation

Ballast Installation

Transmutations 19, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver, nickel silver

Transmutations 19, 2016, foraged brick, inherited pearls, silk, sterling silver, nickel silver

 

Velvet in October

Hilary Pfeifer Lure Installation

Hilary Pfeifer Lure Installation

Kathleen Browne Spectacle Necklace

Kathleen Browne Spectacle Necklace

April Higashi Pendant

April Higashi Pendant

Kay Sekimachi

Kay Sekimachi

Erica Bello Pop-Up Bow Brooch

Erica Bello Pop-Up Bow Brooch

Junko Mori Nigella

Junko Mori Nigella

Jane Dodd Brown Bear Pendant

Jane Dodd Brown Bear Pendant

Tom Hill Preening Bird

Tom Hill Preening Bird

Junko Mori

Junko Mori

Boline Strand Earrings

Boline Strand Earrings

Tom Hill

Tom Hill

Adam Thorpe

Adam Thorpe

Zachery Lechtenberg Beaker

Zachery Lechtenberg Beaker

 

 

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi: CrossPass

CrossPath_PR_1000September 8-October 9, 2016

Artists’ Reception: Friday, September 9, 6-8pm

CrossPass is a project featuring collaborative and solo works by artists Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi that examines place through expanded media and the intimate lens of jewelry and small objects. The project targets a distinctive stretch of the Interstate 10 corridor connecting the unique borderplex region of El Paso, Texas to Las Cruces, New Mexico. The objective of CrossPass is to allow site-specific locations and the artists’ shared personal inquiries along this route to initiate the collection of images, video and sound which directly influences the creation of jewelry and objects. The viewer is asked to join them in their investigation of this land awash with dramatic terrain, vernacular structures and a multitude of boundaries; and, to uniquely discover these sites through the body.

About the Artists:

Motoko Furuhashi was born in 1982 in Tokyo, Japan. While growing up in Tokyo, she received her introduction to art from her grandfather. Her recent works are inspired by her experiences traveling around the world and the road that takes her from one place to another. Motoko received her MFA from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at New Mexico State University. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally including at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, the Oakland Museum of California, and Nobana Art Works in Ginza in Tokyo. Publications include 500 Plastic Jewelry design by Lark Books, New Rings: 500+ Designs from Around the World by Nicolas Estrada, and Humor in Craft by Brigitte Martin.

Furuhashi Artist Statement:

“I am deeply fascinated with imperfection and the complexity of the natural cycle of growth, decay, and death as the processes that govern life. The overall intent with my work has been to slow the viewer down and make what goes unnoticed important. By highlighting what is viewed as imperfect my work can bring relevance to the object. My belief is that objects only gain importance when the artist draws attention to them. My work is a shift in the meaning of perfection, transforming our perception of reality to new perspectives.”

Demitra Thomloudis is a studio jeweler, visual artist, and an Assistant Professor in the Jewelry and Metalwork at the Lamar Dodd School of Art at the University of Georgia. Originally from the Philadelphia area, she received her MFA from San Diego State University and her BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art. Her work is recognized nationally and internationally and she has exhibited, lectured, and taught at institutions, fairs, and events such as SOFA Chicago, Athens (Greece) Jewellery Week, and the Penland School of Crafts. Artist residencies include a yearlong appointment at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft and Smitten Forum. Demitra is included in publications such as 500 Plastic and Resin Jewelry, 500 Enameled Objects, and The Art of Jewelry: Plastic & Resin: Techniques, Projects and Inspiration. Demitra’s work is represented by Charon Kransen Arts-USA, Alliages Organization-France, and Penland Gallery at the Penland School of Crafts-USA.

Thomloudis Artist Statement:

“My jewelry is influenced by the ve­­rnacular architecture and landscapes of site-specific locations. This interest has led me to identify particular aesthetic characteristics and construction techniques that I employ to create works to be worn on the body. As an artist using jewelry and objects as an artistic format for self-expression, my work intends to challenge the construct of the medium as a means to examine value, material sign systems, and extensions of personal and place identity. By relating to the aesthetics of architecture, landscape, and place in this way, I see jewelry having the potential to connect us closer to the world we are surrounded by.”

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 1, 2016, Steel, enamel, silver

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 1, 2016, Steel, enamel, silver

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 2, 2016, Nickel silver, brass, silver, land segment, ink jet print, gesso

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 2, 2016, Nickel silver, brass, silver, land segment, ink jet print, gesso

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 3, 2016, Nickel silver, steel, sand

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 3, 2016, Nickel silver, steel, sand

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 4, 2016, Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 4, 2016, Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 5, 2016, Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 5, 2016, Steel, sand, dry grass, acrylic, paint, land segment, silver

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 7, 2016, Brass, powder coat, sand, found materials

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 7, 2016, Brass, powder coat, sand, found materials

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 8, 2016, Steel, brass, cement, resin, pigment, fibers

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 8, 2016, Steel, brass, cement, resin, pigment, fibers

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 9, 2016, Nickel silver, fabric, steel

Demitra Thomloudis and Motoko Furuhashi, Site 9, 2016, Nickel silver, fabric, steel

Demitra Thomloudis, Over the Fence, Installation, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Over the Fence, Installation, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Neighborhhood #4, Detail from the installation Over the Fence, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Neighborhood #4, Detail from the installation Over the Fence, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Neighborhhood #1, Detail from the installation Over the Fence, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Neighborhood #1, Detail from the installation Over the Fence, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Neighborhhood #2, Detail from the installation Over the Fence, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Demitra Thomloudis, Neighborhood #2, Detail from the installation Over the Fence, 2016, Cement, brass, paint, graphite pencil, steel, resin

Motoko Furuhashi, NMSU Parking Lot (New Mexico State University), 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, NMSU Parking Lot (New Mexico State University), 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, Mesilla, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, Mesilla, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, Baylor Canyon Path, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, Anthony, Sculpture, 2016, Tape

Motoko Furuhashi, Anthony, Sculpture, 2016, Tape

Motoko Furuhashi, New Road, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

 

Motoko Furuhashi, Sonoma Ranch, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, Anthony, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

Motoko Furuhashi, Baylor Canyon Path, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

NMSU (New Mexico State University), Sculpture, Tape

Motoko Furuhashi, NMSU (New Mexico State University), Sculpture, 2016, Tape

Motoko Furuhashi, Rio Grande, 2016, Tape, road segments, brass, silver, powder coat, paint

 

 

Junko Iijima: Migration

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September 8 – October 9, 2016
Artist’s Reception: Friday, September 9, 6-8pm

San Francisco’s Velvet da Vinci is proud to present Junko Iijima: Migration, a special installation by the Portland based artist.  The show will run from September 8 through October 9, 2016.  An opening reception with the artist will take place on Friday, September 9 from 6-8pm.

Iijima’s “Migration” installation represents an exploration of the melding and divergence of cultural signifiers from Japan with global popular culture. Created during her second Arts/Industry iron-casting residency at the Kohler Company in Wisconsin, this series of small iron and brass sculptures draws formal inspiration from the traditional Japanese Nanbu tea kettle, as well as American pop aesthetics. On her most recent body of work, the artist states:

“I am attracted to objects that retain their cultural identities, obvious stereotypes. I observe and investigate the mixing of cultures through their commodities; how objects from different cultures influence and impact one another, in particular, the intertwining of the contemporary culture of Japan, where I’m from, and America, where I live.

Through my work, I explore the cultural and social underpinnings of both decorative and functional objects. Recently I have been exploring traditional cast-iron patterning from Japanese Nanbu Ironware (best known as black iron tea kettle) while considering pop culture forms. Small bronze sculptures and the drawings demonstrate the melding of cultural signifiers through commodities, and are part of an on-going study and examination of visual languages; creating hybrids of the past and present, from the East and the West.”

Iijima came to the United States as a high school exchange student from Tokyo, Japan. Fascinated by the diversity of American culture and the US educational system, Iijima remained in the states and received her Masters in Metalsmithing from the University of Oregon. She currently teaches Metalsmithing and 3D Foundation courses at several colleges in the Portland, Oregon area.

 Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Junko Iijima, Migration (Detail), 2016, Iron, brass

Brooke Marks-Swanson

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Brooke Marks-Swanson 
Baskets: Increase/Decrease

 

August 4-31, 2016
Artist’s Reception: Saturday, August 6, 6-8pm

 

Velvet da Vinci is proud to present Baskets: Increase/Decrease, Brooke Marks-Swanson’s first solo exhibition at the gallery.  The show will run from August 4-31, 2016.  An opening reception with the artist will take place on Saturday, August 6 from 6-8pm.

On her most recent body of work, Marks-Swanson states:

“Born from the human need to protect ourselves from the elements, knitting quickly became a common thread throughout Europe and the Middle East early in the common era. To me, it represents the human need, artistry in its variations, and a universal language.

I discovered knitting looking for a personal connection, which quickly led to an obsession with the discovery of variation in a simple stitch. Through knitting fine leather, I have discovered a familiar vocabulary of the rigid construction common in metal fabrication. Sensitivity and quietness stems from purposeful parameters.

I draw inspiration from antiquing, which provides a visual reservoir of objects loaded with content and hints of remembrance. I was attracted to a massive strand of colorful, miniature, woven grass baskets that evoked a distant memory of traveling to Mexico as a child.

Baskets are powerful objects. They have existed since the beginning of man and throughout history—and still today in many cultures—are essential for transporting and storing the necessities of life. Like us, baskets contain memories, secrets, and human experience.

Through the purposeful combination of knit leather and basket form, I have found meaningful connections sustaining my need to challenge and respond.”

– Brooke Marks-Swanson, 2016

Marks-Swanson earned an MFA from the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois and a BFA from the School of Fine Arts at Indiana University. Her jewelry has been featured in numerous publications including three Lark Books: 500 Plates and Chargers; The Craft of Silversmithing: Techniques, Projects, Inspiration; and The Art of Enameling: Techniques, Projects, Inspiration. Works by Marks-Swanson have exhibited internationally and can be found in the collection of the Muzeum w Walbrzychu, Walbrzych in Poland.

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket#12, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, horn, copper, 36”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #12, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, horn, copper, 36”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket#11, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, silver, 18”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #11, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, silver, 18”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #6,, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, silver, 22k gold leaf, rare earth magnet, 24”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Red Form Earrings, 2016, Leather, silver, 22k gold leaf

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Red Form Earrings, 2016, Leather, silver, 22k gold leaf

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket#10 Neckpiece, 2016, Leather, silver, 18k gold, 22k gold leaf, 6” diameter, 24” long

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #10 Neckpiece, 2016, Leather, silver, 18k gold, 22k gold leaf, 6” diameter, 24” long

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket#17 Brooch, 2016, Leather, silver, 22k gold leaf, 4.25 x 1.5 x 1.5”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #17 Brooch, 2016, Leather, silver, 22k gold leaf, 4.25 x 1.5 x 1.5”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket#5, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, silver, 40"

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #5, 2016, Neckpiece, Leather, silver, 40″

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #18 Brooch, 2016, Sterling silver, 4 x 2.25 x 1.25

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #18 Brooch, 2016, Sterling silver, 4 x 2.25 x 1.25

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Bundle Earrings, 2016, Leather, silver

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Bundle Earrings, 2016, Leather, silver

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #14, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 22k gold leaf, 18”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #14, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 22k gold leaf, 18”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #7, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 66”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #7, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 66”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #1, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 28”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #1, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 28”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Line, 2016, Earrings, leather, silver, 22k gold leaf

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Line, 2016, Earrings, leather, silver, 22k gold leaf

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #9, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 36”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #9, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 36”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #2, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 32”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #2, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver, 32”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #8, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver. 22k gold, 66”

Brooke Marks-Swanson, Basket #8, 2016, Neckpiece, leather, silver. 22k gold, 66”

Gene Pijanowski: 30 Years of Jewelry and Objects

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February 5 – March 9, 2014

Velvet Da Vinci is proud to present Gene Pijanowski: 30 Years of Jewelry and Objects.  The historic exhibition will feature over 40 important works by the world  renowned artist from the late 1970‘s through the mid 2000’s, marking the largest gallery exhibition of Pijanowski’s work in over two decades.

The show will run from February 5th through March 9th, 2014. An Opening Reception will take place on Friday February 7th, from 6 to 8 pm.

Eugene (Gene) Pijanowski’s work can be seen as a marriage of eastern and western tradition and style, representing an integration of modernist aesthetics and ancient sensibilities.  Drawing from traditional Japanese concepts, techniques, and materials, the artist investigates the relationships between process and craft, content and form, and meaning and function. Works by Pijanowski can be found in private and museum collections worldwide; highlights include the Metropolitan Musuem of Art, NYC, the Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery, Washington D.C., the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan, and many more.  To view a full PDF of the press release, please click here:  VelvetdaVinci_Pijanowski_PressRelease_FIN

Preview of Featured Works:

Eugene Pijanowski Untitled Medallion, 1980 Bronze 2½" in diameter

Eugene Pijanowski
Untitled Medallion, 1980
Bronze
2½” in diameter

Eugene Pijanowski Skinner’s Blade, 1988 Mokume-gane silver, copper & kurmido knife: 6-¼" x 2-½" x ¼"

Eugene Pijanowski
Skinner’s Blade, 1988
Mokume-gane silver, copper & kurmido
knife: 6-¼” x 2-½” x ¼”

Eugene Pijanowski Untitled Hollowware, 1977 Mokume-gane copper/shakudo 2½" x 2¾" x 3¾"

Eugene Pijanowski
Untitled Hollowware, 1977
Mokume-gane copper/shakudo
2½” x 2¾” x 3¾”

Aeon Profit / Piano Forte

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Stitched Panorama

On the Atrium Wall…

Velvet Da Vinci is proud to host the US debut of Aeon Profit / Piano Forte, an installation of wearable objects made from reincarnated piano parts by the Swedish jewelry design collective A5.

The show, which has previously exhibited in both Stockholm and Munich, will run from February 5th through March 9th, 2014.  An Opening Reception will take place on Friday February 7th, from 6 to 8 pm.

Musical instruments and jewelry share several fundamental similarities: a rich tradition of craftsmanship, function, ornamentation, and inherent value. Both are meant to last generations and to be passed from individual to individual. Thus when an instrument or a piece of jewelry is no longer wanted or needed it falls into a particular space of limbo, the owner wishes to part with the item yet at the same time hopes that it will continue its existence. It is in this way that the group A5, Adam Grinovich, Romina Fuentes, and Annika Pettersson, came into contact with a piano.  To view a full PDF of the press release, please click here: VelvetDaVinci_PRESSRELEASE_PianoForte2014

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A5_Piano_Forte_Studio7A5_Piano_Forte_Studio8

Kay Sekimachi + June Schwarcz

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Kay + June: April 1 – 30, 2014

In celebration of the SFO Museum’s exhibition “Turn, Weave, Fire, and Fold: Vessels from the Forrest L. Merrill Collection,” Velvet Da Vinci is proud to exhibit an important collection of works by two California masters, fiber artist Kay Sekimachi and enamelist June Schwarcz.  The show will run from April 1st through the 30th, 2014.  To view a full PDF of the press release, please click the link below:

VelvetDaVinci_PRESSRELEASE_JuneSchwarz.KaySekimachi_2014

Featured Works:

Kay Sekimachi Vessel #5, 2014 Khaki paper with linen threads 6 3/4 X 5"

Kay Sekimachi
Vessel #5, 2014
Khaki paper with linen threads
6 3/4 X 5″

Kay Sekimachi Vessel #02, 2014 Brown hornets nest paper bowl 6 3/4" X 3 1/4"

Kay Sekimachi
Vessel #02, 2014
Brown hornets nest paper bowl
6 3/4″ X 3 1/4″

Kay Sekimachi Vessel #4, 2014 Orange antique paper 6 3/4 X 3 1/4"

Kay Sekimachi
Vessel #4, 2014
Orange antique paper
6 3/4 X 3 1/4″

Kay Sekimachi Vessel #1, 2014 Pink/yellow handmade paper with inclusion 5 3/4 X 3 1/2"

Kay Sekimachi
Vessel #1, 2014
Pink/yellow handmade paper with inclusion
5 3/4 X 3 1/2″

Kay Sekimachi Black + White Twine Lines Split ply, paper cord, Danish twine Approximately 10 X 6 X 5" each

Kay Sekimachi
Black + White Twine Lines
Split ply, paper cord, Danish twine
Approximately 10 X 6 X 5″ each

Kay Sekimachi Pendant , 2012 Painted coral on string Necklace: 21" long, Pendant, 1" wide

Kay Sekimachi
Pendant , 2012
Painted coral on string
Necklace: 21″ long, Pendant, 1″ wide

Kay Sekimachi Necklace (Bubbles), 2011 Bubble shells, paper twine 9 1/2" long

Kay Sekimachi
Necklace (Bubbles), 2011
Bubble shells, paper twine
9 1/2″ long

Kay Sekimachi Dots II, 2011 Linen, Warp (DXE) 11 1/2 X 11 3/4"

Kay Sekimachi
Dots II, 2011
Linen, Warp (DXE)
11 1/2 X 11 3/4″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2376, 2012 Copper, enamel 8 1/2 X 8 C 7 1/4"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2376, 2012
Copper, enamel
8 1/2 X 8 C 7 1/4″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2461, 2012 Copper, enamel 4 X 6 X 10 1/2"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2461, 2012
Copper, enamel
4 X 6 X 10 1/2″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2454, 2012 Silver 8 1/2 X 8 1/2 X 10 1/2"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2454, 2012
Silver
8 1/2 X 8 1/2 X 10 1/2″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2496, 2013 Copper, enamel 6 X 6.5 X 8"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2496, 2013
Copper, enamel
6 X 6.5 X 8″

June Schwarcz Vessel 1007 Copper, enamel 4 x 4 1/2 X 6"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 1007
Copper, enamel
4 x 4 1/2 X 6″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2371, 2009 Copper, enamel 4 x 4 1/2 X 6"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2371, 2009
Copper, enamel
4 x 4 1/2 X 6″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2383, 2009 Copper, enamel 4 x 4 1/2 X 7"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2383, 2009
Copper, enamel
4 x 4 1/2 X 7″

June Schwarcz Vessel 2415, 2010 Copper, enamel 6 X 4 X 6 1/2"

June Schwarcz
Vessel 2415, 2010
Copper, enamel
6 X 4 X 6 1/2″